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WST counts down to the Imperial War Museum’s grand re-opening

Friday July 18, 2014

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Saturday 19th July marks the long-awaited re-opening of the Imperial War Museum London to mark one hundred years since the outbreak of the First World War on 1st August 1914.

In anticipation of this milestone event, WST explores the pioneering new exhibitions schools can expect to see at the museum, following its £40 million refurbishment project.

One of the most highly-anticipated elements of the new-and-improved Imperial War Museum is undoubtedly the First World War Galleries, introduced in a beautiful short film by Aardman animation below. This extended collection tells the individual stories of those who lived through the Great War, both at home and on the battlefields.

A new exhibition labelled ‘Truth and Memory’ is also set to be a major highlight, collecting together a diverse array of artwork inspired by World War One. Combining pieces created during the war with more recent reactions to its legacy, in every artistic style, this collection encourages pupils to re-imagine war from a variety of perspectives.

This balance between the contemporary and the historic is also extended in another of the museum’s new exhibitions: an eye-opening collection based on the war in Afghanistan. Curated by British artist Mark Neville, this body of work combines intimate photographic portraits with slow-motion filmography to offer a compelling look at the real people involved in the conflict.

These innovative exhibitions will join the museum’s longer-running collections, with iconic Spitfire planes displayed along with artefacts from the Holocaust and relics from the world of wartime espionage. There’s also an engaging calendar of educational events for schools to attend, from interactive Horrible Histories Spy workshops to creative response sessions.

WST are proud to be able to give schools the chance to experience this inspiring new tribute to WW1 and help pupils attain a greater understanding of the significance of war; get in touch for further details.